Parthenocissus Tricuspidata Fruit

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parthenocissus quinquefolia
parthenocissus tricuspidata
parthenocissus
parthenocissus vitacea
parthenocissus inserta
parthenocissus henryana
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Parthenocissus tricuspidata is a flowering plant in the grape family ( Vitaceae ) native to eastern Asia in Japan , Korea , and northern and eastern China . Although unrelated to true ivy , it is commonly known as Boston Ivy , grape ivy , and Japanese ivy , and also as Japanese creeper , and by the name woodbine (though the latter may refer to a number of different vine species).

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

No serious insect or disease problems. Mildews, leaf spots, canker and wilt may occur. Potential insect pests include beetles, scale and leaf hoppers. Once attached to the side of a building or wall, this vine becomes difficult to remove and will damage painted surfaces and leave residues. This vine may invasively spread to nearby unmanaged areas.


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